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Tag Archives: Wallace Stevens

Celebrity beauty 1914 and 2014

Ensconced in my apartment not far from the Times Square madness of New Year’s Eve, ready to eat a salami-on-rye, drink my Milwaukee’s Best, and watch my Sinister Cinema DVD of The Invisible Man vs. The Human Fly, I offer this brief glimpse of how things have changed…

With the advent of 2014, we’ll be hearing a lot about 1914, when the First World War started, bringing with it the beginnings of the society we know today. With that in mind, let’s look at a picture of a female celebrity who was at the top of her game in 1914, the British actress Gladys Cooper…regarded as eminently “drool-worthy” in her day–and I fully understand why.

As the poet Wallace Stevens wrote, “Beauty is momentary in the mind, the fitful tracing of a portal; but in the flesh, it is immortal.” I agree.

One of the great beauties of her era.

One of the great beauties of her era.

And now let us consider a pic of a female celebrity of 2014, Coco

As the creator & former editor (1988-2005) of CHEEKS magazine, I approve.

As the creator & former editor (1988-2005) of CHEEKS magazine, I approve.

Hmm, has it only been a century since 1914? Seems to me Coco’s butt represents 50,000 years of evolution!

Happy 2014, my fellow fanciers of the Eternal Feminine in all its myriad forms!

 
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Posted by on December 31, 2013 in Times Square

 

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Distracted by a gal in high heels and ankle socks…

As a freelance writer I work six days a week, Sunday through Friday. By the end of the week, my brain is somewhat fried, but I persevere when I have deadlines…

I’m working on a research article about 1950s men’s magazines that I want to finish today, so for a change, to get some air first, I went out to have a little breakfast before isolating myself in my Laboratory of Literary Lust. Most days I just have a bagel or roll at home and then start working.

This morning, when I was leaving the midtown McDonald’s where I’d had a plain sausage biscuit, coffee, and read the New York Post, I saw an amazing young woman with an older dame whom I presumed was her mother. I just got that vibe about their relationship (“vibe”–sheesh, does that word ever date me!). Anyway, they looked like tourists. The younger gal was tall, about twenty, wearing blue denim short-shorts as well as frilly ankle socks and high heel pumps with a flower print pattern. I saw the shoes and socks first, then my eyes traveled up her long legs to her attractive face. I held the door open for them and couldn’t help but smile at the blond-tressed babe while her black-haired mother looked on with a puzzled expression. The girl smiled back tentatively at horny ole Uncle Irv, seeming to realize the mesmerizing power of her gams and indulging my moment of lecherous approval before entering the restaurant.

Nice moment, but no wonder I’m having a “hard” time concentrating today…

I tried to find a picture on the Web to give you a visual intimation of what I saw, and this is what I came up with. It’s not the same in details like the skirt or the shoes or even the socks, but it has the innocent yet sexy feeling of it:

"Beauty is momentary in the mind--the fitful tracing of a portal; but in the flesh, it is immortal."--Wallace Stevens

After finding this image, I kept browsing, and found a picture that distracted me even more than the original source of my distraction, that girl at McDonald’s:

Now I'm never going to get anything done...

I’m convinced on some primal level of fantasy that the face of the owner of these feet must be as ravishingly beautiful as her splendid toes…although I know from real life that’s not necessarily the case. But interestingly, the fantasy persists…

I must also note that rapidly taking in the details of the beauties I see on the streets helps me come up with many story ideas. I see somebody beautiful, I memorize or jot down details of her look, and an entire short story can pop into my mind a short time later.

 
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Posted by on July 8, 2011 in Erotica

 

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